Experiments in Taekwondo

It's Throwback Thursday and I've just taken out my favorite Taekwondo T-Shirt.. Initially I went to Taekwondo class in 2014 out of sheer curiosity, wanting to kick things -- and also draw things (a strange combo, I know!)  What I found there was an amazing group of people who were so devoted to their discipline -- and so supportive as a community.  It was truly inspiring..  I spent a year there drawing each week - also worked my way to yellow belt and designed a commissioned t-shirt from some sketches I did.  My roundhouse kick made some progress too ;)

Here are the photos from the Blue Wave summer camp, which took place in Tunbridge Vermont. Sweaty and fun.  Much of the camp walked around in my t-shirt design (even up to three days without washing;)), which was exciting and slightly surreal.

** Also, some notes on the figure drawing:  Taekwondo, like many martial arts, seems to be based both on building body strength and coordination for offensive and defensive moves/stances, but also on knowing the opponent and working with their tactics continuously throughout the match.  I found that the better I understood the sport, the easier the drawings got.  [And of course, the observation done in drawing fueled the learning].  My approach is as follows: I tend to [visually] block the body into segments, head, chest, hips, legs… But then to find a defining movement to capture, as a starting point for the drawing, one that goes through the whole body.  And working from there.  An adaptation of fashion drawing..  It took many drawings to make progress!  

Thanks so much to Blue Wave of Burlington VT for letting me be a part of it :)


This adorable girl did Irish step dancing for us!

This adorable girl did Irish step dancing for us!

Camp couple modeling the Tshirt (& tie-dye!)

Camp couple modeling the Tshirt (& tie-dye!)

Some serious workouts..

Some serious workouts..

A work called "Ready"… drawn from Taekwondo blackbelt Sara Sayles.  Drawings that overlap bodies can often get to the core of a movement better than a single complete figure.  (Black China marker on sketch paper.) 

A work called "Ready"… drawn from Taekwondo blackbelt Sara Sayles.  Drawings that overlap bodies can often get to the core of a movement better than a single complete figure.  (Black China marker on sketch paper.)